Update Guide → Tor.
authorSoren Stoutner <soren@stoutner.com>
Mon, 23 Jan 2017 21:37:46 +0000 (14:37 -0700)
committerSoren Stoutner <soren@stoutner.com>
Mon, 23 Jan 2017 21:37:46 +0000 (14:37 -0700)
.idea/dictionaries/soren.xml
app/src/main/assets/en/guide_tor.html

index 366bf4ccea8a79295760d581c9d0fb801b06f26c..a3bba35f1392eabdb27658648a1e9c5ea9530911 100644 (file)
       <w>exynos</w>
       <w>favoriteicon</w>
       <w>fbee</w>
+      <w>fdfilter</w>
+      <w>fdid</w>
       <w>firebase</w>
       <w>framelayout</w>
       <w>gerlach</w>
       <w>intl</w>
+      <w>ipleak</w>
       <w>isfolder</w>
       <w>khtml</w>
       <w>konqueror</w>
@@ -83,6 +86,7 @@
       <w>webkay</w>
       <w>webkitversion</w>
       <w>whatismyip</w>
+      <w>wouldn</w>
       <w>yoyo</w>
       <w>zenlte</w>
       <w>zeroflte</w>
index 46a6404af496a7e9795e9a02ca1239a91a921ac2..83223f6e079e69173a3ac37544f5874de014a9ea 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 <!--
-  Copyright 2016 Soren Stoutner <soren@stoutner.com>.
+  Copyright 2016-2017 Soren Stoutner <soren@stoutner.com>.
 
   This file is part of Privacy Browser <https://www.stoutner.com/privacy-browser>.
 
   along with Privacy Browser.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>. -->
 
 <html>
-<head>
-    <style>
-        h3 {
-            color: 0D4781;
-        }
-
-        img.center {
-            display: block;
-            margin-left: auto;
-            margin-right: auto;
-        }
-    </style>
-</head>
-
-<body>
-<h3>Tor and Its Limits</h3>
-
-<p>There are two general categories of bad actors that want to infringe on the privacy of the web: malicious governments
-    with access to ISPs (Internet Service Providers) and mega corporations that run social and advertising networks.
-    TOR (The Onion Router) is useful in protecting privacy from malicious governments but not from mega corporations.</p>
-
-
-<h3>Malicious Governments</h3>
-
-<p>Malicious governments often spy on their citizens to punish dissent or human rights activity.  They commonly either
-    operate the local ISPs or they can force them to disclose information showing every IP address that is visited
-    by each user.  Tor is designed to defeat this infringement of privacy by encrypting the traffic
-    from a user's device and routing it through three separate servers on the internet before sending it on to the final destination.
-    This means that no individual ISP, server, or website, can know both the <a href="https://ipleak.net">IP address the user's device</a>
-    and the IP address of the final web server.  Malicious governments and the ISPs they control cannot tell which
-    web servers a user is accessing, although they can tell that the user is using Tor.  In some parts of
-    the world, using Tor could be construed as an evidence of illegal behavior ("if you didn't have anything
-    to hide you wouldn't be hiding your traffic from us") and users could be punished because governments
-    assume they are doing something that is prohibited. Thus, Tor can be helpful, but isn't a panacea.</p>
-
-
-<h3>Mega Corporations</h3>
-
-<p>When a user connects to a web server, the web server can see the user's IP address. Although it isn't a perfect science,
-    IP addresses can be turned into physical addresses with a <a href="https://www.whatismyip.com/">fair amount of accuracy</a>.
-    Small web servers typically rely on IP addresses to identify the location of the users visiting their site.
-    Tor is a good solution to mask the user's location from these servers.  But large mega corporations
-    that own social media and advertising networks use a whole profile of information that is designed to track users
-    across devices and IP addresses.  These profiles employ a variety of techniques to identify users, including JavaScript,
-    cookies, tracking IDs, and <a href="https://panopticlick.eff.org/">browser fingerprinting</a>. Because the vast majority
-    of the websites on the internet either load an ad from one of the major networks or embed social media icons with their
-    associated JavaScript, these corporations have build profiles for almost every user online and can track their internet
-    activity across unrelated sites.</p>
-
-<p>They track every site that is visited, everything that is purchased, every credit card that is used to
-    make a purchase, every address that items are shipped to, and the GPS metadata of every picture that is
-    uploaded to the internet.  They build a profile of a user's age, gender, marital status, address, political affiliations,
-    religious affiliations, family circumstance, number of pets, and everything else they can get their hands on.
-    They even buy up databases of credit card usage at local stores, so they can track the off-line purchasing patterns of the users
-    in their profiles. Because they already have much more accurate address information about a user than an IP address discloses,
-    Tor provides no real privacy protection against mega corporations.</p>
-
-<p>The single best privacy protection against mega corporations is to browse the web with JavaScript disabled, followed
-    by blocking ad networks, disabling cookies and DOM storage, and using a browser that is difficult to fingerprint.</p>
-
-
-<h3>Using Tor</h3>
-
-<p>Despite the limitations, Tor can be useful in some circumstances.  The Tor project has an app for Android called Orbot,
-    which is available on <a href="https://f-droid.org/repository/browse/?fdfilter=orbot&fdid=org.torproject.android">F-Droid</a>
-    and everywhere else that Privacy Browser is distributed.  Privacy Browser has a setting to use Orbot as
-    a proxy.  When this is turned on, Privacy Browser's app bar will have a light blue background instead of
-    the default light grey. When Privacy Browser's Orbot proxy setting is enabled, internet access
-    will not work unless Orbot is running and connected to Tor. Because traffic is being routed through several Tor nodes,
-    using Tor is often much slower than connecting straight to the internet.</p>
-
-<img class="center" src="images/tor.png" height="640" width="360">
-</body>
+    <head>
+        <!-- We have to make an image into its own block to center it. -->
+        <style>
+            h3 {
+                color: 0D4781;
+            }
+
+            img.center {
+                display: block;
+                margin-left: auto;
+                margin-right: auto;
+            }
+        </style>
+    </head>
+
+    <body>
+        <h3>Tor and Its Limits</h3>
+
+        <p>There are two general categories of bad actors that want to infringe on the privacy of the web: malicious governments with access to ISPs (Internet Service Providers) and mega corporations that run social and advertising networks.
+            TOR (The Onion Router) is useful in protecting privacy from malicious governments (which spy on traffic in transit) but not from mega corporations (which embed malicious code on web servers).</p>
+
+
+        <h3>Malicious Governments</h3>
+
+        <p>Malicious governments often spy on their citizens to punish dissent or human rights activity. They commonly either
+            operate the local ISPs or they can force them to disclose information showing every IP address that is visited
+            by each user.  Tor is designed to defeat this infringement of privacy by encrypting the traffic
+            from a user&rsquo;s device and routing it through three separate servers on the internet before sending it on to the final destination.
+            This means that no individual ISP, server, or website, can know both the <a href="https://ipleak.net">IP address the user&rsquo;s device</a>
+            and the IP address of the final web server. Malicious governments and the ISPs they control cannot tell which
+            web servers a user is accessing, although they can tell that the user is using Tor. In some parts of
+            the world, using Tor could be construed as an evidence of illegal behavior (&ldquo;if you didn&rsquo;t have anything
+            to hide you wouldn&rsquo;t be encrypting your traffic&rdquo;) and users could be punished because governments
+            assume they are doing something that is prohibited. Thus, Tor can be helpful, but isn&rsquo;t a panacea.</p>
+
+
+        <h3>Mega Corporations</h3>
+
+        <p>When a user connects to a web server, the web server can see the user&rsquo;s IP address. Although it isn&rsquo;t a perfect science,
+            IP addresses can be turned into physical addresses with a <a href="https://www.whatismyip.com/">fair amount of accuracy</a>.
+            Small web servers typically rely on IP addresses to identify the location of the users visiting their site.
+            Tor is a good solution to mask the user&rsquo;s location from these servers. But large mega corporations
+            that own social media and advertising networks use a whole profile of information that is designed to track users
+            across devices and IP addresses. These profiles employ a variety of techniques to identify users, including JavaScript,
+            cookies, tracking IDs, and <a href="https://panopticlick.eff.org/">browser fingerprinting</a>. Because the vast majority
+            of the websites on the internet either load an ad from one of the major networks or embed social media icons with their
+            associated JavaScript, these corporations have built profiles for almost every user online and can track their internet
+            activity across unrelated sites.</p>
+
+        <p>They track every site that is visited, everything that is purchased, every credit card that is used to
+            make a purchase, every address that items are shipped to, and the GPS metadata of every picture that is
+            uploaded to the internet. They build a profile of a user&rsquo;s age, gender, marital status, address, political affiliations,
+            religious affiliations, family circumstances, number of pets, and everything else they can get their hands on.
+            They even buy up databases of credit card transactions at local stores, so they can track the off-line purchasing patterns of the users
+            in their profiles. Because they already have much more accurate address information about a user than an IP address discloses,
+            Tor provides no real privacy protection against mega corporations.</p>
+
+        <p>The single best privacy protection against mega corporations is to browse the web with JavaScript disabled, followed
+            by blocking ad networks, disabling cookies and DOM storage, and using a browser that is difficult to fingerprint.</p>
+
+
+        <h3>Using Tor</h3>
+
+        <p>Despite its limitations, Tor can be useful in some circumstances. The Tor project has an app for Android called Orbot,
+            which is available on <a href="https://f-droid.org/repository/browse/?fdfilter=orbot&fdid=org.torproject.android">F-Droid</a>
+            and everywhere else that Privacy Browser is distributed. Privacy Browser has a setting to use Orbot as
+            a proxy. When this is turned on, Privacy Browser&rsquo;s app bar will have a light blue background instead of
+            the default light grey. When Privacy Browser&rsquo;s Orbot proxy setting is enabled, internet access
+            will not work unless Orbot is running and connected to Tor. Because traffic is being routed through several Tor nodes,
+            using Tor is often much slower than connecting directly to the internet.</p>
+
+        <img class="center" src="images/tor.png" height="640" width="360">
+    </body>
 </html>
\ No newline at end of file