Spanish Guide → Local Storage provided by Jose A. León Becerra.
[PrivacyBrowser.git] / app / src / main / assets / en / guide_local_storage.html
index ae110a6b4a92227a8662a132afb0e2659a3351c5..2f48d6f549023d3e6fa5aaf3e0c77f930534394e 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 <!--
-  Copyright 2016 Soren Stoutner <soren@stoutner.com>.
+  Copyright 2016-2017 Soren Stoutner <soren@stoutner.com>.
 
   This file is part of Privacy Browser <https://www.stoutner.com/privacy-browser>.
 
   along with Privacy Browser.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>. -->
 
 <html>
-<head>
-<style>
-    h3 {
-        color: 0D4781;
-    }
-</style>
-</head>
+    <head>
+        <style>
+            h3 {
+                color: 0D4781;
+            }
 
-<body>
-<h3>First-Party Cookies</h3>
+            img.title {
+                vertical-align: bottom;
+                height: 32;
+                width: 32;
+            }
+        </style>
+    </head>
 
-<p>Cookies can be divided into two types.  First-party cookies are cookies set by the website in the URL bar at the top of the page.</p>
+    <body>
+        <h3><img class="title" src="images/cookie_dark_blue.png"> First-Party Cookies</h3>
 
-<p>From the early days of the internet, it became obvious that it would be advantageous for websites to be able to store
-    information on a computer for future access.  For example, a website that displays weather information could ask the
-    user for a zip code, and then store it in a cookie.  The next time the user visited the website, weather information
-    would automatically load for that zip code, without the user having to enter the zip code, and without the need for
-    the user to create an account on the website (which would be overkill for such a simple task).</p>
+        <p>First-party cookies are set by the website in the URL bar at the top of the page.</p>
 
-<p>Like everything else on the web, clever people figured out all types of ways to abuse cookies to do things that users
-    would not approve of if they knew they were happening.  For example, a website can set a cookie with a unique serial
-    number on a device.  Then, every time a user visits the website on that device, it can be linked to a unique profile
-    the server maintains for that serial number, even if the device connects from different IP addresses, as cell phones often do.</p>
+        <p>From the early days of the internet, it became obvious that it would be advantageous for websites to be able to store
+            information on a computer for future access. For example, a website that displays weather information could ask the
+            user for a zip code, and then store it in a cookie. The next time the user visited the website, weather information
+            would automatically load for that zip code, without the user having to enter the zip code, and without the need for
+            the user to create an account on the website (which would be overkill for such a simple task).</p>
 
-<p>Some websites with logins require first-party cookies to be enabled for a user to stay logged in.  Cookies aren't the only only way
-    a website can maintain a user logged in as they move from page to page on the site, but if a particular website has chosen to
-    implement logins in that way, enabling first-party cookies on that site will be the only way to use the functionality.</p>
+        <p>Like everything else on the web, clever people figured out all types of ways to abuse cookies to do things that users
+            would not approve of if they knew they were happening. For example, a website can set a cookie with a unique serial
+            number on a device. Then, every time a user visits the website on that device, it can be linked to a unique profile
+            the server maintains for that serial number, even if the device connects from different IP addresses, as cell phones often do.</p>
 
-<p>If first-party cookies are enabled but JavaScript is disabled, the privacy icon will be yellow <img src="images/warning.png" height="16" width="16">
-    as a warning.</p>
+        <p>Many websites with logins require first-party cookies to be enabled for a user to stay logged in. Cookies aren&rsquo;t the only way
+            a website can maintain a user logged in as they move from page to page on the site, but if a particular website has chosen to
+            implement logins in that way, enabling first-party cookies on that site will be the only way to use the functionality.</p>
 
+        <p>If first-party cookies are enabled but JavaScript is disabled, the privacy icon will be yellow <img src="images/warning.png" height="16" width="16">
+            as a warning.</p>
 
-<h3>Third-Party Cookies</h3>
 
-<p>Third-party cookies are set by portions of a website that are loaded from servers different from the URL at the top of the page.
-    For example, most website that have advertisements load them from a third-party ad broker, like Google's
-    <a href="https://www.google.com/adsense/start/#?modal_active=none">Ad Sense</a>. Every time the website loads, it requests the ad
-    broker to display some ads.  The ad broker analyzes any information they may have about the user, looks at the current
-    rate advertisers are willing to pay for their ads, and selects those to display. The section of the website that displays
-    the ads is loaded from the third-party broker's server instead of the main server.</p>
+        <h3><img class="title" src="images/cookie_dark_blue.png"> Third-Party Cookies</h3>
 
-<p>Because most of the advertisements on the internet are displayed from only a few brokers, it didn't take long for them to realize
-    that they could set a tracking cookie on the user's device and know every place that user goes. Every time an ad loads from a broker,
-    the first thing it does it check to see if if the device already has a unique serial number in a tracking cookie. If it does, it looks up
-    the profile for that serial number and makes a note of the new site. This is why a user can do a search on one website for a
-    product that they typically don't look for, like walnuts, and then suddenly start seeing advertisements for walnuts on every
-    website they visit.</p>
+        <p>Third-party cookies are set by portions of a website that are loaded from servers different from the URL at the top of the page.
+            For example, most website that have advertisements load them from a third-party ad broker, like Google&rsquo;s
+            <a href="https://www.google.com/adsense/start/#?modal_active=none">Ad Sense</a>. Every time the website loads, it requests the ad
+            broker to display an ad. The ad broker analyzes any information they may have about the user, looks at the current
+            rate advertisers are willing to pay for their ads, and selects the one to display. The section of the website that displays
+            the ads is loaded from the third-party broker&rsquo;s server instead of the main server.</p>
 
-<p>In addition to ad brokers, social media sites discovered they could get in on the action. A few years ago, the major social media sites
-    like Facebook and Twitter convinced a large number of websites that it would be in there best interest to place little social media
-    icons on their pages. These are not just images. They contain <a href="https://developers.facebook.com/docs/plugins/like-button/">imbedded code</a> that
-    links back to the social media site, and, among other things, loads a third-party cookie on the device.  These cookies are placed even if the user does
-    not have an account with the social media platform. Over time, companies like Facebook (which also run an ad network) have built up quite a large number
-    of detailed profiles about people who have <a href="http://www.theverge.com/2016/5/27/11795248/facebook-ad-network-non-users-cookies-plug-ins">never even
-    created an account on their site</a>.</p>
+        <p>Because most of the advertisements on the internet are processed by only a few brokers, it didn&rsquo;t take long for them to realize
+            that they could set a tracking cookie on the user&rsquo;s device and know every place that user goes. Every time an ad loads from a broker,
+            the first thing it does it check to see if if the device already has a unique serial number in a tracking cookie. If it does, it looks up
+            the profile for that serial number and makes a note of the new site. This is why a user can do a search on one website for a
+            product they typically don&rsquo;t look for, like walnuts, and then suddenly start seeing advertisements for walnuts on every
+            website they visit.</p>
 
-<p>There is almost no good reason to ever enable third-party cookies.  On devices with Android KitKat or older (version <= 4.4.4 or API <= 20), WebView
-    does not <a href="https://developer.android.com/reference/android/webkit/CookieManager.html#acceptThirdPartyCookies(android.webkit.WebView)">differentiate
-    between first-party and third-party cookies</a>. Thus, enabling first-party cookies will also enable third-party cookies.</p>
+        <p>In addition to ad brokers, social media sites discovered they could get in on the action. A few years ago, the major social media sites
+            like Facebook and Twitter convinced a large number of websites that it would be in there best interest to place little social media
+            icons on their pages. These are not just images. They contain <a href="https://developers.facebook.com/docs/plugins/like-button/">embedded code</a> that
+            links back to the social media site, and, among other things, loads a third-party cookie on the device. These cookies are placed even if the user does
+            not have an account with the social media platform. Over time, companies like Facebook (which also runs an ad network) have built up quite a large number
+            of detailed profiles about people who have <a href="http://www.theverge.com/2016/5/27/11795248/facebook-ad-network-non-users-cookies-plug-ins">never even
+            created an account on their site</a>.</p>
 
+        <p>There is almost no good reason to ever enable third-party cookies. On devices with Android KitKat or older (version <= 4.4.4 or API <= 20), WebView
+            does not <a href="https://developer.android.com/reference/android/webkit/CookieManager.html#setAcceptThirdPartyCookies(android.webkit.WebView, boolean)">differentiate
+            between first-party and third-party cookies</a>. Thus, enabling first-party cookies will also enable third-party cookies.</p>
 
-<h3>DOM Storage</h3>
 
-<p>Document Object Model storage, also known as web storage, is like cookies on steroids. Whereas the maximum combined storage size for all cookies from
-    a single URL is 4 kilobytes, DOM storage can hold between <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_storage#Storage_size">5-25 megabytes per site</a>.
-    Because DOM storage uses JavaScript to read and write data, enabling it will do nothing unless JavaScript is also enabled.</p>
+        <h3><img class="title" src="images/ic_web_dark_blue.png"> DOM Storage</h3>
 
+        <p>Document Object Model storage, also known as web storage, is like cookies on steroids. Whereas the maximum combined storage size for all cookies from
+            a single URL is 4 kilobytes, DOM storage can hold <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_storage#Storage_size">megabytes per site</a>.
+            Because DOM storage uses JavaScript to read and write data, enabling it will do nothing unless JavaScript is also enabled.</p>
 
-<h3>Form Data</h3>
 
-<p>Form data contains information typed into web forms, like user names, addresses, phone numbers, etc., and lists them in a drop-down box on future visits.
-    Unlike the other forms of local storage, form data is not sent to the web server without specific user interaction.</p>
-</body>
+        <h3><img class="title" src="images/ic_subtitles_dark_blue.png"> Form Data</h3>
+
+        <p>Form data contains information typed into web forms, like user names, addresses, phone numbers, etc., and lists them in a drop-down box on future visits.
+            Unlike the other forms of local storage, form data is not sent to the web server without specific user interaction.</p>
+    </body>
 </html>
\ No newline at end of file